September 16th, 2014
September 15th, 2014
September 13th, 2014
groovychupacabra:

Dragonfly wing.

groovychupacabra:

Dragonfly wing.

(Source: ziggyminx, via daintyyetdangerous)

September 11th, 2014
Would you like an adventure now, or shall we have our tea first?
Peter Pan, J. M. Barrie (via whatalovelythought)

(Source: quotes-for-reference, via h-o-r-n-g-r-y)

September 10th, 2014
crossedstirrups:

houseofhanover:

funnyorwtf:

Saw this on a door at work.

# the lights are agog # the ceiling’s aghast # is the desk drawer in love at last?

need to reblog this again for those tags

crossedstirrups:

houseofhanover:

funnyorwtf:

Saw this on a door at work.

the lights are agog # the ceiling’s aghast # is the desk drawer in love at last?

need to reblog this again for those tags

(Source: viralvdio, via princess-of-stories)

Only put off until tomorrow what you are willing to die having left undone.
umamulherdefe:

╰♡╮╰♡╮╰♡╮

umamulherdefe:

(Source: baudedelicadezas, via princess-of-stories)

September 9th, 2014
unconsumption:


The cost of building new classrooms and schools shouldn’t prohibit students in the developing world from accessing a quality education, but new construction, even using inexpensive materials like cinder block, can run up a five-digit bill in construction costs. Now, Hug It Forward, a nonprofit in Guatemala, has figured out how to build new schools on a shoestring budget by turning the plastic bottles that litter the countryside’s villages into raw construction materials.
A plastic school might sound like it’s better suited for Barbies than for people, but the technology—developed by the Guatemalan nonprofit Pura Vida—is actually quite clever and allows for schools to be built for less than $10,000. The plastic bottles are stuffed with trash, tucked between supportive chicken wire, and coated in layers of concrete to form walls between the framing. The bottles make up the insulation, while more structurally sound materials like wood posts are used for the framing.

More: Guatemalan Schools Built from Bottles, Not Bricks Plastic Bottle School’s A Cheap Alternative in Guatemala

unconsumption:

The cost of building new classrooms and schools shouldn’t prohibit students in the developing world from accessing a quality education, but new construction, even using inexpensive materials like cinder block, can run up a five-digit bill in construction costs. Now, Hug It Forward, a nonprofit in Guatemala, has figured out how to build new schools on a shoestring budget by turning the plastic bottles that litter the countryside’s villages into raw construction materials.

A plastic school might sound like it’s better suited for Barbies than for people, but the technology—developed by the Guatemalan nonprofit Pura Vida—is actually quite clever and allows for schools to be built for less than $10,000. The plastic bottles are stuffed with trash, tucked between supportive chicken wire, and coated in layers of concrete to form walls between the framing. The bottles make up the insulation, while more structurally sound materials like wood posts are used for the framing.

More: Guatemalan Schools Built from Bottles, Not Bricks Plastic Bottle School’s A Cheap Alternative in Guatemala

Falling in love with yourself first doesn’t make you vain or selfish, it makes you indestructible.
Things I’ll teach my children. (via h-o-r-n-g-r-y)

(Source: humblebackbones, via h-o-r-n-g-r-y)

You won’t find reasonable men on the tops of tall mountains.
Hunter S. Thompson (via h-o-r-n-g-r-y)

(Source: billyfatjohn, via h-o-r-n-g-r-y)